CIVIL RELIGION IN EUROPE

Abstract

This contribution demonstrates that in relation to societal crises and personal existential anxieties new varieties of religious practice and experience have gained importance in Europe. Based on the analysis of two recent rituals of movement and contemplation – the Dutch silent march and pilgrim treks in Europe – I have sought to uncover manifestations of civil religion. Arising in societies under threat, both ritual forms represent in their mediatized expression alternative public theologies centered around an ideal of a society at peace and possessing moral unity. It is this mediatization of these crisis rituals that gives them a meaning beyond itself, offering a moral and spiritual frame of reference for both European society as a whole and for its citizens individually.

Keywords

anxiety, heritage, mediatization, memorialization, crisis rituals, civil religion

How to Cite

(2011) “CIVIL RELIGION IN EUROPE”, Ethnologia Europaea 41(2), p.7-23. doi: https://doi.org/10.16995/ee.1083

Publisher Notes

  • This article was previously published by Museum Tusculanum Press.

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